News Briefs: Dec. 7. 2016

Fordham Mourns Death of Thomas Vinci

Thomas G. Vinci, Ed.D., UGE ’49, professor emeritus and associate dean emeritus at the Graduate School of Education (GSE), passed away on Nov. 24. Vinci was 93 years old. Vinci’s funeral was held on Saturday, Dec. 3 at St. Ambrose Catholic Church in Deerfield Beach, Florida. Vinci earned his B.S. in 1949 from Fordham’s School of Education. After earning his Ed.D. from Columbia University, Vinci began teaching at Fordham’s Graduate School of Education as an assistant professor in 1967 and later as a full professor. In 1974, he began serving as associate dean of the school until 1988 when he retired. Vinci was also the author of 27 chapters and monographs in textbooks and publications, as well as a recipient of the Doctorate Association of New York’s “Outstanding Educator of the Year” award in 1983. Vinci was also director of the Graduate School of Education’s alumni association

NCATE Accredits Fordham University GSE

The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) has granted Fordham University Graduate School of Education a full, seven-year accreditation. NCATE’s accreditation system is performance-based and aims to ensure that all prospective teachers in the school is qualified. NCATE’s goal is to ensure graduates of the educational programs are prepared to interact with families and individuals in a professional setting. NCATE intends to guarantee that students are ready to work in educational, psychological and counseling fields. Fordham University GSE met all standards, and NCATE emphasized GSE’s effectiveness and collaboration with other disciplines and schools. NCATE accreditation standards fall under the single specialized accreditation system for United States educator preparation, the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP).

Fordham Honors Staff Members at 1841 Awards

Fordham University held its annual 1841 awards, which honors support staff members who have worked at Fordham for 20 years, on Nov. 30. This was the 34th annual presentation of the 1841 awards. 16 employees were recognized at the awards. Rev. Joseph M. McShane, S.J., president of the university, spoke at the event, praising them for the integral they play in Fordham’s operation. At the event, those being honored shared stories of how they came to apply to Fordham. Staff members remembered anecdotes of their time at Fordham. Families of recognized staff members also attended the event to support their spouses and parents. Many of the employees’ children attended or currently are enrolled at Fordham University. Some of the staff members are taking Fordham classes themselves. The awards are named after the year 1841, when Fordham University was founded.

McGinley Lecture Focuses on Wisdom and Learning

Patrick J. Ryan, S.J., Laurence J. McGinley Professor of Religion and Society, held this fall’s McGinley lecture on Nov. 15 at Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus and on Nov. 16 at Fordham’s Rose Hill campus. The lecture was titled, “Wisdom and Learning: Higher Education in the Jewish, Christian and Muslim Traditions.” The talk was inspired by the motto on the Great Seal of Fordham, “Sapientia et Doctrina,” which translates to “Wisdom and Learning.” Ryan presented the lecture with Magda Teter, Ph.D., Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies, and Ebru Turan, Ph.D., assistant professor of history. The lecture focused on the roots of education in each spiritual tradition and what aspects they all share in common and how they differ. The talk included an understanding of the specific Jesuit perspective and Ignatius of Loyola’s focus on education. The event ended with a Q&A session between the audience and panelists.

 

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