Alternate Soundtrack of Songs For The Season

Fleet Foxes fits the cozy sweater-weather vibe perfectly, with many tracks that serve as festive alternate backgrounds (Courtesy of Flickr).

Fleet Foxes fits the cozy sweater-weather vibe perfectly, with many tracks that serve as festive alternate backgrounds (Courtesy of Flickr).

By Meredith Nardino

Fleet Foxes fits the cozy sweater-weather vibe perfectly, with many tracks that serve as festive alternate backgrounds (Courtesy of Flickr).

Even though this year has felt more like an eternity, I was still shocked to turn my calendar to its final page this weekend. The holiday season has always been one of my favorite times of the year, but I’ve never been one of those people who counts down the days until its acceptable to play Christmas music. If I have to listen to more than 30 seconds of “All I Want for Christmas Is You,” my head starts to hurt. This playlist offers an alternative soundtrack for anyone else who loves getting into the holiday spirit but can’t stand holiday songs.

1. “White Winter Hymnal” – Fleet Foxes
Too on the nose? Perhaps, but there’s really nothing better than a cozy sweater on a chilly day and some Fleet Foxes playing softly in the background. For much of the mid 2000s, this Seattle band was the epitome of earthy indie folk. Blending traditional folk sounds with the rich harmonies used by 60s pop greats, Fleet Foxes somehow have a song for every mood. “White Winter Hymnal” is one of their best known tracks, and for good reason.

2. “Winter of Our Youth” – Bastille
Bastille specializes in the self-described genre of “post-apocalyptic party music,” and their sophomore record couldn’t be better proof. Wild World was released in the fall of 2016, just before some events that made it feel like we truly were headed for the apocalypse. “Winter of Our Youth” is one of the softer moments on this anxiety-filled record. The track is an introspective and nostalgic coming-of-age story, wrapped into a crisp three and a half minutes.

3. “Snow” – Angus and Julia Stone
Snow might be the best album Angus and Julia Stone have produced in their decade long career. It’s the Australian siblings’ fourth studio record, and feels more stylistically and lyrically complete than the previous three. The title track is airy and light, its dream-like chorus supplemented by a minimalistic melody. Even though each of the siblings has ventured into the solo industry, “Snow” is evidence that they are at their best when they are performing together.

4. “Landslide (Fleetwood Mac cover)” – The Japanese House
When it comes to covers, there are those few bands that everyone knows are sacred territory. Fleetwood Mac is certainly one to tread lightly around, even more so when “Landslide” is the song you’re attempting to make your own. The Japanese House’s Amber Bain tackled this goliath of a ballad with impressive poise and grace, stepping pretty far outside her electronica-tinged comfort zone. Though nothing compares to Stevie Nicks’ utterly heartbreaking original, this cover does the classic justice.

5. “Planets” – Joseph
If the fearless pop duo Overcoats were to transition into the world of acoustic folk, they would sound like Joseph. This trio of sisters has kept a low profile since releasing their debut record last year. On their latest seven track EP, the DIY-folk singers prove exactly why they have the potential to be the world’s new favorite Americana band. “Planets” highlights the strongest tool in the trio’s arsenal: their powerful, perfectly placed harmonies.