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The Latest Fashion Month and the Death of Streetwear

Kanye+West%27s+brand+Yeezy+is+central+to+streetwear+culture.+%28Courtesy+of+Flickr%29
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The Latest Fashion Month and the Death of Streetwear

Kanye West's brand Yeezy is central to streetwear culture. (Courtesy of Flickr)

Kanye West's brand Yeezy is central to streetwear culture. (Courtesy of Flickr)

Kanye West's brand Yeezy is central to streetwear culture. (Courtesy of Flickr)

Kanye West's brand Yeezy is central to streetwear culture. (Courtesy of Flickr)


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By: Isiah Magsino

Put away those chunky Balenciaga sneakers and tracksuits; the emphasis on streetwear is no longer in — sorry hypebeasts! Who would  want to spend close to a grand on chunky sneakers that can be found easily at a thrift store anyway?

Streetwear and urban life have been a bothersome trend since the rise of Yeezy’s and Kardashian influence which glamourized athletic stripes, chunky dad sneakers and slouchy shirts. The word “fashion” briefly lost its meaning as the term was mistakenly being associated with $1,500 tattered sweaters.

Yes, I am salty about it. Growing up, the glamour, details and art behind garments is what initially drew me into fashion, and seeing hyped Walmart brands such as Champion being overpriced and considered “fashion” really took a toll on me (which is a bit dramatic).

On a more optimistic note, the latest fashion month, which spanned from New York, London, Milan and Paris, showed that designers are finally turning their noses high and rejecting the streetwear trend while pointing the spot light back on artistry and craftsmanship.

Burberry, Fendi and Salvatore Ferragamo are only a few of many fashion labels that turned away from streetwear by deciding to emphasize women’s empowerment instead. Specifically, fashion designer Riccardo Tisci’s debut as Burberry’s latest creative director signified a woman who doesn’t want to be seen and fetishized, but rather someone who wants to get work done and make advancements in her career. Motifs such as strong shoulders, deconstructed and structured silhouettes, and high collars made it clear that women were meant to be the leaders of the corporate world.

Balenciaga and Margiela in Paris have surely incorporated sophisticated architecture in their collections. When regarding craftsmanship being brought back into fashion, Sarah Burton for Alexander McQueen caught my eye as she made an incredible push towards sophistication and elegance in womanhood.

Burton’s work paid homage to milestone rituals such as weddings, deaths and births. What was most enjoyable about the McQueen collection was that Burton included many styles that resembled highly-detailed Victorian wedding dresses while also incorporating elements of a modern tailored suit. Though it may lead one to think that the show might have lost a streamlined theme, the overarching message of women’s versatility and beauty in a variety of forms reigned supreme.

Continuing with elegance, Pierpaolo Piccioli at Valentino transported me to summers in Southern France, Italy and Spain. Along with glamour, Piccioli appealed to my sense of wanderlust and escapism.

The Valentino collection began with a series of black dresses that were unique to one another. The first was a cotton off-the-shoulder gown that was followed by a slimming dress and later a pleated dress with balloon arms. After the series of black garments, red, orange and printed tulle dresses emerged, and I truly felt the need to purchase a one-way ticket abroad. The flowy romantic dresses detailed with feathers and accessorized with large straw hats strengthened my yearning for a Call Me By Your Name summer.

Ultimately, these are only but a few examples of how high fashion is snapping back to… well, high fashion. Although designers incorporated elements of streetwear and urban-wear in past collections, it’s finally safe to say goodbye!

Here’s my advice to anyone who reads this or cares about how they look before stepping out of their apartments: stop investing in trends such as the one I spoke about earlier. You’ll end up wasting money and looking outdated by next season.

As for fashion as a whole, peace and order have thankfully returned to the industry.

Kanye West’s brand Yeezy is central to streetwear culture. (Courtesy of Flickr)

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The Latest Fashion Month and the Death of Streetwear