The Fordham Ram

The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

Isiah+Magsino%2C+FCRH+%E2%80%9819%2C+stands+in+the+lobby+of+the+Metropoltian+Opera+House%2C+where+he+attended+a+production+of+%E2%80%9CMarnie.%E2%80%9D+%28Courtesy+of+Isiah+Magsino%29
Isiah Magsino, FCRH ‘19, stands in the lobby of the Metropoltian Opera House, where he attended a production of “Marnie.” (Courtesy of Isiah Magsino)

Isiah Magsino, FCRH ‘19, stands in the lobby of the Metropoltian Opera House, where he attended a production of “Marnie.” (Courtesy of Isiah Magsino)

Isiah Magsino, FCRH ‘19, stands in the lobby of the Metropoltian Opera House, where he attended a production of “Marnie.” (Courtesy of Isiah Magsino)


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






By Isiah Magsino

Upon entering the main lobby, thoughts of the first class on the Titanic and debutante balls wove in and out of my head.

The building’s interior design says “opulent”: red velvet carpets, grand chandeliers, oil paintings framed in bronze and high ceilings.

The grand venue described is none other than the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center, and on Oct. 22 the debut of the contemporary opera, “Marnie,” took place.

I took the subway to this event, and I know for a fact I was a vision. The subway: Grimey public transportation that wreaks of rat urine.

I served as a major juxtaposition while en route to the grand event. I, not to toot my own horn, was a red rose in a garden of sunflowers.

Knowing the nature of opera attire, I understood that I had to bring regality to a mix of traditional and contemporary black-tie fashion.

Being that New York City is hitting it’s colder times, I began the base of my ensemble with a grey cashmere turtleneck, following grey dress pants to create a monochromatic look.

High-ankle, pointed patent-leather boots finished the base, but it was the outer layer that made me feel like the belle of the ball. (I’m not as conceited as I’m currently sounding, but everyone has to admit that they love to reminisce on a time where they looked incredible.)

My outer-layer is always the piece that grabs one’s attention in the winter.

Being that the opera is an incredibly flamboyant event, I decided to take out my secret weapon: A dark navy blue, longline suit jacket, detailed with white lapels and Chanel brooch.

With my chosen ensemble alongside the venue of the opera house, I felt like an absolute monarch.

But I was not the only one of the night that felt the need to dress like Napoleon Bonaparte.

Fashion shows consist of various fashion styles from all show goers whether it is street style, downtown chic, Upper East Side class, etc. However, the night of the opera only consisted of first-class fashion.

Miu Miu fur coats, Saint Laurent leather gloves, Brooks Brothers tuxedos and Grenson oxford shoes populated the arena.

I have never felt so overwhelmed and welcomed at the same time.

Like mentioned before, it was as if I was transported into the scene of the Titanic where Rose Bukkater introduces her aristocratic family to her lesser love interest Jack Dawson at first-class dinner.

But aside from my own and other audience members’ ensembles, the makeup of the Metropolitan Opera House contributed to the bourgeois fantasy I was experiencing.

The Opera House consists of a series of large oil paintings by Marc Chagall and Cecily Brown. Brown’s mural in the opera house dominates the second floor of the grand staircase, making it very accessible to opera goers.

The production of “Marnie” itself was truly incredible, and I enjoyed it way more than I should. It being a contemporary opera, acting paired heavily with singing.

“Marnie” follows the life of a woman named Marnie (obviously) who is deceptive, stealing from her bosses’ safe and changing her identification to dodge the police.

However, without any spoilers, the audiences see a more complex side of Marnie as the opera progresses.

I have to admit, the beginning was a bit difficult to watch seeing as I was still getting used to my environment, but as the show progressed, I found myself on the edge of my seat because of the extremely dramatic plot.

My appreciation and respect for opera singers grew tremendously. Considering the extremely grand size of the opera house, it was incredible to witness the vocal range of the various artists.

I recall being completely surprised at a young actor and singer, probably around ten years old, who sung his little heart out filling the opera house as well as his older counterparts.

Ultimately, the experience as a whole was life-changing. Even writing this piece brings me back to the night of “Marnie,” hoping to soon be back.

I suggest that everyone indulge in an opera at the Met.

Whether you are in it for the glamour, or if you are in it for the theatrics, there is a place in the house for everyone.

Although I was lucky enough to sit in orchestra seating, tickets for the outer rings start as low as $25.

Isiah Magsino, FCRH ’19, stands in the lobby of the Metropoltian Opera House, where he attended a production of “Marnie.” (Courtesy of Isiah Magsino)

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

    Culture

    An Ode to Wes Anderson

  • The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

    Culture

    Sophomore Leaps Ahead of the Curve

  • The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

    Culture

    No Justice for Mercury or Queen in Bohemian Rhapsody

  • The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

    Culture

    Yung Lean’s Poison Ivy is a Further Descent into Pop

  • The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

    Culture

    Suicide’s Pioneering Proto-Electronica

  • The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

    Culture

    Decoding Clean Green Beauty

  • The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

    Culture

    Boy Erased an Affecting, Vital LGBT Drama

  • The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

    Culture

    Hill Pens Hymn to Skateboard Culture with Mid90s

  • The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

    Culture

    An Inquiry into the finale season of House of Cards

  • The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities

    Culture

    Finding Peace on a Seasonal Walk

Fordham University's Journal of Record Since 1918
The Met’s “Marnie” Is an Opera of Many Identities