The Fordham Ram

Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

The+university+did+not+commit+to+raising+the+minimum+wage+until+it+allocated+money+and+assessed+the+Spring+2018+budget.+%28Kevin+Stoltenborg%2FThe+Fordham+Ram%29
The university did not commit to raising the minimum wage until it allocated money and assessed the Spring 2018 budget. (Kevin Stoltenborg/The Fordham Ram)

The university did not commit to raising the minimum wage until it allocated money and assessed the Spring 2018 budget. (Kevin Stoltenborg/The Fordham Ram)

The university did not commit to raising the minimum wage until it allocated money and assessed the Spring 2018 budget. (Kevin Stoltenborg/The Fordham Ram)


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






By: Natalie Migliore

Fordham has decided to raise minimum wage to $15 for all university employees after concern that they would cap the student worker wage at $13.

Fordham circulated information in late September that raising minimum wage for students would not be in the budget and would be capped at $13 dollars hourly, according to the Fordham SAGES coalition.SAGES sent out an email on Oct. 25 to students, spreading the news on the university’s decision that minimum wage at Fordham would not increase for students.

While New Yorkers would make $15 an hour due to the statewide minimum wage increase, students would continue to make only $13.They asked students to sign a petition to “fight for Fordham’s 15.”“It’s disappointing that that was Fordham’s first instinct to cap it,” Margaret Cohen, FCLC ’20, said. She is a member of SAGES and works at Fordham’s law library. “I think a lot of their values and their mission would align with a livable wage, not to mention a minimum wage, because that is different.”

Cohen said SAGES contacted student workers, asking them to include their concerns besides minimum wage in in the petition. Some students called for Fordham to publicly announce it would comply with any minimum wage raises or guarantee that students with work-study will be given enough hours to make the money they are allotted.

On Oct. 30, the university sent out a statement to students explaining it was unsure where it stood for next semester at the time the decision to cap minimum wage at $13 an hour was made.

“When the University budget for the current fiscal year was drawn up last spring, it wasn’t clear that there would be sufficient funds to cover both the $15 minimum hourly wage and pay the same number of students the University had employed the previous year,” the email said.

Fordham said it wanted to ensure it could pay the same number of students.

“We knew it was an issue,” said Bob Howe, senior director of communications. “It just boils down to finding money in the budget.”

Howe explained that 92 percent of money for student employment comes from tuition. The university needed to assess the budget that was decided on in spring of 2018 and look at the number of students attending in the fall.

“We didn’t know the budget, because it doesn’t firm up until late September or early October,” he said.

Howe said it is not an argument as to whether or not students deserve $15 an hour.

“We all know how expensive New York City is,” Howe said, “Even if the job isn’t their main source of income, it helps.”

Cohen agreed that New York is expensive, but said the university still needs to do more by centering the students in the budgets that are made.

“How can students do well in school, give to their community, engage with their community, be present in their classes, if they are not secure in their basic needs?” Cohen asked. “That’s where the livable wage comes in; it is just so students can survive here.”

Sally Ho, FCRH `20, is also a member of SAGES and works in the Fordham Law Clinic. She said she always expected Fordham to raise the minimum wage. Ho has worked at Fordham for the past two years, including summers.

“I adjusted my life to tell myself at this point minimum wage is going to be thirteen dollars and then at that point it will be fifteen,” she explained.

“And I knew I was going to make a little bit more money.”

She said increasing minimum wage is not going to mean much because the prices will also increase. Ho said she wants Fordham to be more transparent with minimum wage intentions.

“A lot of questions haven’t been addressed fully yet, like is our maximum amount we’re allowed to make increased too?”

She said the university is not looking at the full picture.

Cohen said city laws are put in place be followed.

“It’s disappointing to see this place that we’re told is our home, not value that,” Cohen said.

“They didn’t do anything we’re congratulating them on by giving us minimum wage.”

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

    Student Life

    USG’s CSM Holds Week of Action

  • Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

    Student Life

    CSA Hosts Commuter Town Hall

  • Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

    Academics

    Uniquely-Structured Courses Draw Higher Student Interest

  • Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

    Metro

    Democrats Narrowly Take House of Representatives

  • Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

    Academics

    University Seeks to Add Tenured Professors

  • Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

    Feature

    Student Starts Company to Promote Positivity

  • Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

    Metro

    Students Canvass in NY-01

  • Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

    Student Life

    Trump Administration Threatens Title IX

  • Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

    Student Life

    USG Approves She’s the First and Society of Visual Arts

  • Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students

    Fordham in the Bronx

    Halloween Dog Parade Back on in Tompkins Square Park

Fordham University's Journal of Record Since 1918
Fordham Grants $15 Wage to Students